American Hustle (2013) Review

24 12 2013

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Copyright Columbia Pictures 2013

★ ★ ★ ★ 1/2

So, the narrowing down of what film to go see yesterday came down to this film and The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug; this one won out, but Smaug will probably be seen within the week since I’m off all week from work.

American Hustle takes place in 1978, and primarily follows the characters Irving Rosenfield (Christian Bale), a small time con-artist and dry cleaner owner, and Sydney Prosser (Amy Adams), his mistress and accomplice who mostly acts under a British alias of Lady Edith Greensly. After getting into a bind with the FBI, they agree to assist agent Ritchie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) on a small series of cons that eventually leads to hopeful nabbing of not only members of congress and popular Camden, N.J. mayor Carmine Polito (Jeremy Renner), but also several high standing members of the mob. In the process, Rosenfield’s difficult wife, Rosalyn (Jennifer Lawrence), manages to get intertwined at all the wrong places at all the wrong times.

Director David O. Russell has definitely hit his stride with his past few films, solidifying himself as a writer/director to be reckoned with. This film expertly captures the gawdy era of the late 1970s, while carrying a very reminiscent feeling of a Martin Scorsese film from his heyday, especially Goodfellas and Casino. Hey, we even get a surprise cameo from Bobby D! 

The script is strong and has some surprising twists, it is shot beautifully and smartly, but where the film really shines is in its performances. Bale and Adams are absolutely superb, and Cooper and Renner are excellent supporting characters. Even from a physical perspective, Bale has completely transformed himself gaining some 65 pounds, and his New York accent is very impressive, especially knowing this is a Welshman playing the part.

I thoroughly enjoyed this film and would highly recommend it. I think we’re going to see a lot of this one through the awards season.

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Greenberg (2010) Review

22 12 2013

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Copyright Focus Features 2010

★ ★ ★ 1/2

OK, I know I have neglected this site terribly, but I’m going to try my best to hop back on board with some regularity. Work, hobbies, social activities and just plain boring errands and such have literally eaten up most of my time as of late. However, in an effort to keep some form of consistency with the updates, I’m going to try to do “mini-reviews”. So, the new posts might not be as in depth as some of the old reviews, but at least there won’t be breaks of months on end.

OK, now on to Greenberg. After spending the better part of 30 minutes looking for something I either haven’t seen and/or was in the mood to see on Netflix, I came upon this quirky little flick. A Noah Baumbach film, I kind of knew what to expect going into it — your typical mumblecore, Woody Allen-lite pseudo-intellectual comedy-drama. And, guess what? That’s exactly what it turned out to be!

Ben Stiller plays the lead role of Roger Greenberg, a 40-something more-or-less unemployed ex-musician who just exited a mental hospital and is spending 6 weeks at his brother’s house in LA to focus on doing nothing. His brother, a wealthy hotelier is on vacation with the family in Vietnam, and LA also serves as Roger’s hometown, though he currently lives in New York, and seems to carry a New York-esque attitude about life in general.

His brother’s nanny/assistant, Florence, is played by stereotypical Baumbach-written female, Greta Gerwig — a slightly neurotic mid 20-something with low self esteem and seemingly no direction in life. As Greenberg revisits his old friends and former bandmates during his six week stay, he of course, begins a relationship of sorts with Florence that carries all the insecurities and road bumps of what we have come to expect from Baumbauch’s films.

I know I am weighing heavily on the stereotypical nature of this movie to its director’s style and canon; however, don’t get me wrong, Greenberg is not a bad film. It’s definitely not Baumbauch’s best work, but by no means bad. I enjoyed the film, and think anyone who has an affinity for oddball/neurotic romance films will enjoy. Yes, the main character of Roger Greenberg is fairly morose and pathetic to a degree, but Stiller’s performance helps you build enough empathy to accept him as a protagonist. 








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